POLITICS

Vincent Gray hiring probe: Sulaimon Brown to appear before D.C. Council

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Sulaimon Brown says that Mayor Vince Gray was directly involved in promises made to him that he would be given a city job and given campaign contributions if he agreed to stay in last year's mayoral race and level attacks against then-incumbent Adrian Fenty, who unsuccessfully sought re-election.

#Sulaimon Brown says cand. @mayorvincegray was actively involved in plot to provide money and a job in exchange for his attacks on A. Fenty.less than a minute ago via Twitter for BlackBerry® Favorite Retweet Reply

He says he will present physical evidence today to prove his claims.

Brown said he will show the council committee additional money orders that have not been released before.

"I'm going to rest on that," Brown says.

Gray and his aides have denied the accusations, and no payments have been independently verified.

The U.S. Attorney's Office has said it's looking into Brown's accusations.

Brown told the D.C. Council committee Monday that he many conversations with Gray about campaign strategy, reports the Associated Press. He said that after one face-to-face meeting, Gray told him that a campaign aide had "something for you."

Brown says the campaign aide, Howard Brooks, then handed him an envelope with hundreds of dollars in cash and money orders. Brooks has refused to testify before the Council, invoking his Fifth Amendment privilege, according to the AP.

The council is investigating hiring practices of Mayor Vincent Gray, who has come under fire for allegedly hiring family members of staffers at high salaries, among other charges.

Councilmember Mary Cheh previously released a statement saying Brown had been served a subpoena. Brown denied that. On Tuesday, he accused Mary Cheh, who's holding the hearings, of trying to "score some political points."

Brown, who has accused to mayor of paying him during the election to speak out against former Mayor Adrian Fenty, claims Gray promised him a job.

Brown said federal investigators looking into the accusations of improper hiring practices told him he “can't talk about certain things."

He also argued for a time limit on the appearance at city council.

"They can ask whatever they want to ask in three hours. I have no intentions of sitting there five, six, seven, eight hours. I am not going to do it,” he said.

Judge Judith Macaluso said the city council has a constitutional right to get the answers. She discussed setting a 7 p.m. limit on the hearings.

Brown asked that hearings go no longer than three days, saying he has a family, he's unemployed and is looking for a job.

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