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Far-right Norway suspect's treatise rails against liberals, Muslims

Anders Behring Breivik. Photo: Twitter/@andersbbreivik
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OSLO, Norway (AP) - The man blamed for the terrorist attacks on Norway's government headquarters and an island retreat for young people that left at least 93 dead said he was motivated by a desire to bring about a revolution in Norwegian society, his lawyer said Sunday.

A manifesto he published online - which police are poring over and said was posted the day of the attack - ranted against Muslim immigration to Europe and vowed revenge on "indigenous Europeans," whom he accused of betraying their heritage. It added that they would be punished for their "treasonous acts."

The lawyer for the 32-year-old Norwegian suspect, Anders Behring Breivik, said Sunday that his client wrote the document alone. While police said they were investigating reports of a second assailant on the island, the lawyer said Breivik also claims no one helped him.

Manifesto quotes Unabomber's writings

Parts of the manifesto were taken almost word for word from the writings of "Unabomber" Ted Kaczynski.

The passages copied by Breivik appear in the first few pages of Kaczynski's manifesto. Breivik changed a Kaczynski screed on leftism and what he considered to be leftists' "feelings of inferiority" - mainly by substituting the words "multiculturalism" or "cultural Marxism" for "leftism."

For instance, Kaczynski wrote: "One of the most widespread manifestations of the craziness of our world is leftism, so a discussion of the psychology of leftism can serve as an introduction to the discussion of the problems of modern society in general."

Breivik's manifesto reads: "One of the most widespread manifestations of the craziness of our world is multiculturalism, so a discussion of the psychology of multiculturalists can serve as an introduction to the discussion of the problems of Western Europe in general."

Breivik did not cite Kaczynski, though he did for many other people whose writings he used in his 1,500-word manifesto.

He used at least one portion verbatim: "Feminists are desperately anxious to prove that women are as strong and capable as men. Clearly they are nagged by a fear that women may NOT be as strong and as capable as men."

Kaczynski is serving a life sentence in federal prison in Colorado for mail bombs that killed three people and injured 23 others across the U.S. from the 1970s to the 1990s.

Former FBI agent sees similarities between Olso suspect, Unabomber

Former FBI Agent Terry Turchie, who supervised the federal task force to capture the Unabomber, said Sunday that he saw similarities between the two men.

"They seem to have this anger, the loner aspect, this desire to look back at the way things were and think of themselves as self-reliant," said Turchie, who wrote "Hunting the American Terrorist: The FBI's War on Homegrown Terror" in 2007.

"The real problem is these loners are much more difficult to find and prevent from killing people than other kinds of terrorists," he said.

The treatise detailed plans to acquire firearms and explosives, and even appeared to describe a test explosion: "BOOM! The detonation was successful!!!" It ends with a note dated 12:51 p.m. on July 22: "I believe this will be my last entry."

That day, a bomb killed seven people in downtown Oslo and, hours later, a gunman opened fire on dozens of young people at a retreat on Utoya island. Police said Sunday that the death toll in the shooting rose to 86.

That brings the number of fatalities to 93, with more than 90 wounded.

There are still people missing at both scenes. Police have not released the names of any of the victims.

Police said Sunday that a police officer had been hired to provide security on the island on his own time. It was not clear who hired him or if he was on the island at the time of the attacks.

Six hearses pulled up at the shore of the lake surrounding the island on Sunday, as rescuers on boats continued to search for bodies in the water.

Body parts remain inside the Oslo building, which housed the prime minister's office. In a chilling allusion to the fact that the tragedy could have even been greater, police said Sunday that Breivik still had "a considerable amount" of ammunition for both his guns - a pistol and an automatic weapon - when he surrendered.

Police and his lawyer have said that Breivik confessed to the twin attacks, but denied criminal responsibility for a day that shook peaceful Norway to its core and was the deadliest ever in peacetime. Breivik has been charged with terrorism and will be arraigned on Monday.

Geir Lippestad, Breivik's lawyer, said his client has asked for an open court hearing "because he wants to explain himself."

Police Chief Sveinung Sponheim said a forensics expert from Interpol would join the investigation on Sunday.

European security officials said Sunday they were aware of increased Internet chatter from individuals claiming they belonged to the Knights Templar group that Breivik refers to in the manifesto. They said they were still investigating claims that Breivik, and other far-right individuals, attended a London meeting of the group in 2002. The two officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak about the investigation.

The officials would also not immediately confirm that they had been aware of Breivik as a potential threat.

As authorities pursued the suspect's motives, Oslo mourned the victims. Norway's King Harald V and his wife Queen Sonja and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg crowded into Oslo Cathedral, where the pews were packed, and people spilled into the plaza outside the building. The area was strewn with flowers and candles, and people who could not fit in the grand church huddled under umbrellas in a drizzle.

The king and queen both wiped tears from their eyes during the service for "sorrow and hope."

Afterward, people sobbed and hugged one another in the streets, as many lingered over the memorial of flowers and candles. The royal couple and prime minister later visited the site of the bombing in Oslo.

More was coming to light Sunday about the man who police say confessed to a car bomb at government headquarters in Oslo and then, hours later, opening fire on young people at an island political retreat.

Both targets were linked to Norway's left-leaning Labor Party. Breivik's manifesto pillories the political correctness of liberals and warns that their work will end in the colonization of Europe by Muslims.

Such fears may derive, at least in part, from the fact that Norway has grown increasingly multicultural in recent years as the prosperous Nordic nation has opened its arms to thousands of conflict refugees from Pakistan, Iraq and Somalia.

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