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Iran's supreme leader warns U.S. over alleged D.C. terror plot

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On Sunday Iran's Foreign Ministry summoned the Swiss Charge d'Affairs to Tehran to demand consular access to Arbabsiar.

"Offering personal information about the accused and providing consular access to him is an obligation of the U.S. government. Any delay is contrary to international law," a report on Iranian state TV's website said.
The Swiss Embassy handles American interests because the U.S. and Iran do not have diplomatic relations,

Arbabsiar is a 56-year-old naturalized U.S. citizen who also had an Iranian passport. In May 2011, the criminal complaint says, he approached someone he believed to be a member of the vicious Mexican narco-terror group Los Zetas for help with an attack on a Saudi embassy. The man he approached turned out to be an informant for U.S. drug agents, it says.

The U.S. charges that Arbabsiar had been told by his cousin Abdul Reza Shahlai, a high-ranking member of the Quds Force, to recruit a drug trafficker because drug gangs have a reputation for assassinations.
Iranian lawmakers and analysts have said Iran would not benefit from killing the Saudi ambassador in Washington, even if it might have sought to punish its Saudi rivals for intervening in Bahrain to crush a Shiite-led uprising there.

Majority Shiite Iran regarded with deep suspicion on the Arab side of the Gulf, which is largely Sunni.

Political analyst Sadeq Zibakalam said the accusations were part of a U.S. strategy to encircle Iran.

"The Americans seek to close the circle around Iran at the international level. ... It's a prelude to transferring Iran's dossier to the U.N. Security Council," he said in comments posted on the fararu.com news website Sunday.

Zibakalam, however, said there was no plausible or logical reason for Iran to assassinate the Saudi envoy in Washington.

"If we assume that Iranian officials sought to punish the Saudis for their intervention in Bahrain, there were tens of other venues such as Turkey, India and Pakistan where Iran could carry out an assassination with the least political costs and consequences, not in U.S.," he said.

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