EDUCATION

How do you say "internet sensation" in Chinese?

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Jessica Beinecke hails from Midwest, USA. She’s blond and grew up outside Columbus, Ohio in a little town called Pinkerton.

Jessica Beinecke

She appears quintessentially American, so you might do a double take when she starts working.

From her Capitol Hill apartment, the 24-year-old teaches millions of Chinese English with an American twist: She teaches them useful American slang like “bandonkadonk.”

“Another word for your rear end is bandonkadonk,” she says in one video posted to her YouTube channel.

She's the host of a daily Voice of America web show called “OMG Meiyu,” which means OMG American English. She translates American pop culture and the way we say things to the other side of the world.

In one three-minute webisode that exploded online called “yucky gunk,” a young viewer wanted to know how to translate the yucky stuff in the corner of your eyes – what Americans call “sleepies.”

The video about all things yucky garnered 1.5 million hits alone on China's version of YouTube.

She also teaches such American stables as ordering coffee (below) or answering the phone.

The daily translation videos started in July. Since then, OMG Meiyu has gotten a whopping 4.5 million hits. Jessica Beinecke's gone viral.

Amazingly, despite her fluency, she has only five years of Chinese-language study both in college and abroad.

"I can really understand the struggle of learning a new language of learning a new culture but if you are having fun while you are doing it,” she says.

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