POLITICS

Ivey files to oppose Edwards in Md.'s 4th Congressional District

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Former Prince George’s County State's Attorney Glenn Ivey has officially filed the paperwork to run against Rep. Donna Edwards for the newly redrawn 4th Congressional District seat.

Former Prince George's County State's Attorney Glenn Ivey in 2009. (Photo: Associated Press)

Sources tell ABC7’s Brad Bell that Ivey has won the support of party officials after Edwards publicly challenged the redistricting plan drawn by Maryland Democrats, which is expected to increase the Democratic edge in the state delegation from 6-2 to 7-1.

Edwards joined several Montgomery County officials, state lawmakers, union leaders, and the political director of the NAACP in opposing the plan. They say it divides Montgomery County into three districts in a way that will likely dilute minority representation in the county in which minorities are now the majority, according to the 2010 census.

Edwards said that the new map will possibly lead to having three white men represent the county.

"It's a sad day when Democrats are drawing a map that, I believe, dilutes minority representation in Montgomery County," Edwards said on the Kojo Nnamdi Show on WAMU on October 21.

But Edwards added that once it was a done deal, she would not continue her opposition.

"During tough times, we need to turn to each other and not on each other to provide the best possible representation in Congress. I will be a team player with all of the civic and political leadership from our Congressional delegation to our partners in Annapolis and throughout the District. I look forward to serving the constituents and the people of Maryland on Capitol Hill and in our communities," Ivey said.

Edwards won a special election for the 4th District in 2008 and has won re-election twice since. The district currently includes portions of Prince George’s and Montgomery Counties.

Under the new redistricting, the district loses the Montgomery County portion and will now take in part of Anne Arundel County.

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