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Official: Trustees' support for Paterno eroding

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While praising Spanier's tenure at Penn State, an official of the American Council on Education, said, "The central issue for the board, which is charged with preserving and protecting the institution, is not the rearview mirror."

Joe Paterno has been the head coach in Happy Valley for 46 years. (Photo: Flickr/Allen Mock)

"It's the institution going forward," added Terry Hartle, senior vice president at the council, the main umbrella organization representing colleges and universities nationally.

Much of the criticism surrounding Paterno has concerned his apparent failure to follow up on a report of the 2002 incident, in which Sandusky allegedly sodomized a 10-year-old boy in the showers at the team's football complex. The eyewitness, Mike McQueary, is currently receivers coach for the team but was a graduate assistant at the time.

McQueary told Paterno about the incident the next day, and the coach notified the athletic director, Tim Curley, and the vice president, Glenn Schultz, who in turn notified Spanier. Curley and Schultz have been charged with perjury and failure to report the incident to authorities, as required by state law.

Both men, as well as Paterno, testified that they were told that Sandusky behaved inappropriately in that 2002 incident, but not to the extent of McQueary's graphic account to a state grand jury.

The same grand jury decided the testimony from Curley and Schultz, whose job at the time also gave him oversight of the campus police, were not believable. Pennsylvania Attorney General Linda Kelly said Paterno is not a target of the investigation, although the state police commissioner has chastised him and other Penn State officials for not doing enough to try to stop the suspected abuse.

Sandusky, 67, spent three decades on the Penn State staff before retiring in 1999, but continued to use school and athletic facilities - where prosecutors allege he molested several of the boys - as recently as two weeks ago. He often held football camps for youths on PSU satellite campuses and maintained an office at the Nittany Lions' complex on the main campus.

Sandusky began working with at-risk youths after founding The Second Mile charity in 1977. It now raises and spends several million dollars each year for its programs. According to Internal Revenue Service documents, the foundation last paid Sandusky in 2007, when he received $57,000 as a consultant. He publicly severed ties in 2010.

Paterno is listed on The Second Mile's website as a current member of its honorary board of directors, a group that includes business executives, golfing great Arnold Palmer and several NFL Hall of Famers and coaches, including retired Pittsburgh Steelers stars Jack Ham and Franco Harris.

Authorities have said that Paterno is not a target of the investigation.

Meanwhile, another potential victim has contacted authorities. The man, now an adult, contacted the department on Sunday after seeing media accounts of Sandusky's arrest, Lt. David Young at the Montoursville station said. Investigators took a statement from him and forwarded it to the Rockview station for officers there to pursue, Young said.

U.S. Rep. Patrick Meehan of Pennsylvania said Tuesday he's asked Education Secretary Arne Duncan to look into whether the university violated the Clery Act, which requires schools to publish an annual report of all criminal offenses that are reported to campus security or local police.

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