D.C.

Library of Congress adds films to National Film Registry

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Every year, the Library of Congress selects 25 films to be added to the National Film Registry.

This years list includes Blockbuster hits like "Forrest Gump" and "Silence of the Lambs," as well as some documentaries and silent films.

"Forrest Gump" is the most recent film of this years inductees, released in 1994. The selections span 80 years back to the silent film "A Cure for Pokeritis" (1912).

Also on the list is Disney's "Bambi" (1942).

The registry was created in 1988 by and act of Congress to preserve films that are culturally, historically and aesthetically significant.

Patrick Loughney is the Chief of Audio and Visual Conservation for the Library and helped select this year's inductees from more than 2,000 nominated films.

"We want to be sure 1,000 years from now or more that these films will be able to be seen at quality of image and sound in which they were originally made to be seen by audiences," Loughney said.

The registry now numbers 575 films.

The public can make a reservation to watch the films in the Library of Congress' Reading Room.

Below is a list of the films that made the registry this year.

1. Allures (1961)
2. Bambi (1942)
3. The Big Heat (1953)
4. A Computer Animated Hand (1972)
5. Crisis: Behind A Presidential Commitment (1963)
6. The Cry of the Children (1912)
7. A Cure for Pokeritis (1912)
8. El Mariachi (1992)
9. Faces (1968)
10. Fake Fruit Factory (1986)
11. Forrest Gump (1994)
12. Growing Up Female (1971)
13. Hester Street (1975)
14. I, an Actress (1977)
15. The Iron Horse (1924)
16. The Kid (1921)
17. The Lost Weekend (1945)
18. The Negro Soldier (1944)
19. Nicholas Brothers Family Home Movies (1930s-40s)
20. Norma Rae (1979)
21. Porgy and Bess (1959)
22. The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
23. Stand and Deliver (1988)
24. Twentieth Century (1934)
25. War of the Worlds (1953)

 

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