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Rain forces road closures in several areas

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The effects of Wednesday's drenching rains are still being felt Thursday morning throughout the region.

Flood waters continue to overtake Water Street in Upper Marlboro. (Photo: Brianne Carter)

Due to the heavy rain, road closures are in effect due to flooding, which could make the morning commute hectic in several different areas.

U.S. Route 1 in Beltsville fully reopened just after 6 a.m. after being closed throughout the night in both directions.

Maryland State Police say that the road closed at 9 p.m. on Wednesday near the intersection of Baltimore Avenue and Ammendale Road. Portions of the road in both directions incrementally opened throughout the early morning hours.

A portion of Water Street near Main Street in Upper Marlboro is also closed in both directions due to high water. The road is closed between Main Street and Pennsylvania Avenue is shut down.

In the District, DDOT says that Massachusetts Avenue is closed between Second Street and Columbus Circle NE due to high standing water.

In Charles County, Maryland Route 6/Port Tobacco Road is completely shut down in both directions at Maryland Point Road. Also, Maryland Route 227/Pomfret Road is closed between Brierwood Road and Marshall Corner Road.

Power outage update

More than 2,000 customers in the Washington area, and thousands more in Calvert County, are still without power Thursday morning as a result of the storms.

Pepco is reporting a majority of the outages in the D.C. area. Just fewer than 2,000 of their customers in the District alone are without power. Meanwhile, BG&E and Dominion are reporting isolated outages as well.

As of 6:30 a.m., more than 2,400 customers in Calvert County were still in the dark.

Wintry mix pounds Maryland

A wintry mix of rain and snow covered the Frederick and Hagerstown areas throughout Wednesday night. While it didn't stick and plows were prepared to clear roads, it was frustrating for some drivers who were just trying to get home.

"The roads were really kind of scary," one driver told ABC7.

The snow wasn't sticking in either city but at higher elevations, like Boonsboro, snow quickly accumulated.

State highway plows lined up prepared to do their job, just to make sure Highway 40 was safe to navigate.

Travelers who didn't like driving in the mess found winters abrupt arrival frustrating.

But one driver heading home to West Virginia following a night of Christmas shopping was ready to welcome the wonder's of winter.

This post will be updated.

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