2012 ELECTION

2012 Presidential Debate: Romney declared winner by analysts

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(AP, ABC7) - President Barack Obama's campaign says the president will make, quote, "adjustments," following a presidential debate that most analysts said was won by Republican rival Mitt Romney.

President Barack Obama shakes hands with Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney after the first presidential debate at the University of Denver, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, in Denver. (AP Photo/Pool-Michael Reynolds)

Obama campaign strategist David Axelrod says in a conference call with reporters that the president will need to determine by the next debate how to counter what the campaign considers Romney's evasion on a series of issues.

Axelrod says the president is, quote, "eager" for the next debate. He says they will evaluate his performance and "I'm sure that we will make adjustments."

Axelrod also tried to turn the first debate into a matter of character. He repeatedly accused Romney of "hiding the truth and the facts" from the American people.

An invigorated Romney, meanwhile, basked in rave reviews Thursday after his first face-off with the president, envisioning an inaugural celebration with conservative activists.

Romney ignited loud sustained cheers when he surprised a gathering of Colorado's Conservative Political Action Conference by appearing unannounced the morning after a debate he said was "an opportunity for the American people to see two very different visions for the country."

"I saw the president's vision as trickle-down government and I don't think that's what America believes in," Romney said. "I see instead a prosperity that comes through freedom."

Obama looked to rebound by accusing his rival of remaking himself on the debate stage.

"He knows full well that we don't want what he's been selling for the last year," Obama told supporters gathered on a brisk autumn morning in Denver's Sloan's Lake Park. "Gov. Romney may dance around his positions, but if you want to be president, you owe the American people the truth."

Some analysts say the President’s feisty attacks Thursday were an attempt to rebound from a lackluster showing at the debate.

"The reset button was pushed. The question is does it stay pushed or does President Obama change the narrative,” said Rachel Smolkin, White House Editor of Politico. “President Obama is going to prep extensively-I think we can agree - on the next debate which is a town hall format. Now that tends to play more to President Obama's strengths."

An aggressive Mitt Romney

Obama and Romney sparred aggressively in their first campaign debate Wednesday night over taxes, deficits and strong steps needed to create jobs in a sputtering national economy. "The status quo is not going to cut it," declared the challenger.

Obama in turn accused his rival of seeking to "double down" on economic policies that actually led to the devastating national downturn four years ago - and of evasiveness when it came to prescriptions for tax changes, health care, Wall Street regulation and more.

The economy dominated the evening, as it has the race for the White House all year. Pre-debate opinion polls showed Obama with a slight advantage in key battleground states and nationally.

With early voting already under way in dozens of states, Romney was particularly aggressive in the 90-minute event that drew a television audience likely to be counted in the tens of millions - like a man looking to shake up the campaign with a little less than five weeks to run.

The former Massachusetts governor virtually lectured Obama at one point after the president accused him of seeking to cut education funds. "Mr. President, you're entitled to your own airplane and your own house, but not your own facts," he said.

Romney said he had plans to fix the economy, overhaul the tax code, repeal Obama's health care plan and replace with a better alternative, remake Medicare, pass a substitute for the legislation designed to prevent another financial crash and reduce deficits - but he provided no new specifics despite Obama's prodding.

Said Obama: "At some point the American people have to ask themselves: Is the reason Governor Romney is keeping all these plans secret, is it because they're going to be too good? Because middle class families benefit too much? No."

The two men debate twice more this month, but they were first going their separate ways on Thursday. Obama had campaign stops in Colorado and then Madison, Wis., while Romney was booked into Virginia. All three states are among the nine battlegrounds likely to settle the race.

At times the debate turned into rapid-fire charges and retorts that drew on dense facts and figures that were difficult to follow. The men argued over oil industry subsidies, federal spending as a percentage of the GDP, Medicare cuts, taxes and small businesses and the size of the federal deficit and how it grew.

Obama's performance

Obama sometimes seemed somewhat professorial. Romney was more assertive and didn't hesitate to interrupt the president or moderator Jim Lehrer.

Despite the wonky tone of the debate, Romney managed to make some points by personalizing his comments with recollections of people he said he had met on the campaign trail. In another folksy reference, Romney told Lehrer, a veteran of the Public Broadcasting Service, that he would stop the federal subsidy to PBS even though "I love Big Bird."

Generally polite but pointed, the two men agreed about little if anything.

Obama said his opponent's plan to reduce all tax rates by 20 percent would cost $5 trillion and benefit the wealthy at the expense of middle income taxpayers.

Shot back Romney: "Virtually everything he just said about my tax plan is inaccurate."

The former Massachusetts governor and businessman added that Obama's proposal to allow the expiration of tax cuts on upper-level income would mean tax increases on small businesses that create jobs by the hundreds of thousands.

The two campaign rivals clasped hands and smiled as they strode onto the debate stage at the University of Denver, then waved to the audience before taking their places behind identical lecterns.

There was a quick moment of laughter, when Obama referred to first lady Michelle Obama as "sweetie" and noted it was their 20th anniversary.

Romney added best wishes, and said to the first couple, "I'm sure this is the most romantic place you could imagine, here with me."

Both candidates' wives were in the audience.

Without saying so, the two rivals quickly got to the crux of their race - Romney's eagerness to turn the contest into a referendum on the past four years while the incumbent desires for voters to choose between his plan for the next four years and the one his rival backs.

Romney ticked off the dreary economic facts of life - a sharp spike in food stamps, economic growth "lower this year than last" and "23 million people out of work or stropped looking for work."

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