HEALTH

CVS health care: Employees must submit vital information, or pay fine

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How would you feel if your employer asked you to log in vital, health information? What about if they fined you if you refused?

CVS Pharmacy is now requiring every one of its 200,000 employees who participate in their health plan, to submit their weight, body fat, glucose levels and other vitals. If the employees refuse, they will have to pay an extra $50 per month for the health insurance program, ABC News reported. If they comply, they will not see any changes.

“The approach they’re taking is based on the assumption that somehow these people need a whip, they need to be penalized in order to make themselves healthy,” Patient Privacy Rights founder Dr. Deborah Peel said, according to ABC News.

Tulsa resident Janet Darling-Roden may not want employers to tell her whether to have pizza for lunch, but she does think it's okay for CVS to have more of a say in their employees' health.

"Maybe it's fair that people who smoke and disregard their health should have to pay a little extra, because it's really not fair to the people that work hard and take care of their health," Darling-Roden said.

Cut smokers, like Robert Pirhalla of Stafford, says CVS isn't telling employees to quit speeding, talking and texting while driving or other potentially risky behaviors, so smokers and overeaters shouldn't be singled out.

"Yeah, that is going too far. It's just going in to people's personal lives," Pirhalla said. "If people want to be a smoker then that's their personal choice."

While CVS insists the records will be kept confidential, Waldorf resident Sharon Mason says it's a violation of privacy.

"In this economy, you're trying to manage costs, but you are going to lose employees, you're going to lose business and it's just not a good look overall," Mason explained.

In an email to ABC News, CVS explained that its “benefits program is evolving to help our colleagues take more responsibility for improving their health and managing health-associated costs.”

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