VIRGINIA

Credit union embezzlement threatens family's home

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Only on 7: A single father, raising two children, could be losing his home because of something he didn't do.

The problem began when a man committed suicide. In a note left behind, he admitted to stealing nearly $10 million from a faith-based credit union.

Christopher Tate is not only raising his own two children, he's helping other kids in his neighborhood, many of whom have a parent behind bars.

Now, he's the one who finds himself in a bind.

"I was shocked. I would never have guessed this would happen," he says.

Tate got a letter telling him he has to find a new place to live. And the clock is ticking.

Turns out his landlord was John Dupree, Jr., manager of the Shiloh Federal Credit Union, a faith-based credit union that had been connected to Alexandria's Shiloh Baptist Church.

The National Credit Union Administration is going after dupree's estate to get the money back.

Last April, the night before he was to meet with federal authorities, Dupree died.

The NCUA lawsuit says this note was found on his computer: "By the time you read this I will have taken my life. I have been stealing money from Shiloh Credit Union for several years now. The guilt is overwhelming and I am too big a coward to face those that I have stolen from. I regret my actions, but it is far too late for forgiveness..."

Tate is not the only victim. The credit union has been shut down, but there were hundreds of members.

The feds are still untangling the homes, cars, and other assets the former manager owned.

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