BUSINESS

Washington Business Report: June 22, 2014

Decrease Increase Text size

 

D.C.'s economy

Groundswell and clean energy

Lack of inventory affects housing prices

Housing prices are rising in the D.C. region, and although news like that would usually encourage more homeowners to put their homes on the market, it doesn’t appear like enough homeowners are doing that.

Donna Evers of Evers & Co. Real Estate tells Washington Business Report the problem is inventory. She says most regions are enjoying a recovery, and that houses are indeed selling fast, often for higher than asking price – but that is all because of a lack of inventory.

D.C.'s Groundswell aims to prove 'green' doesn't have to mean 'expensive'

Groundswell is a D.C.-based nonprofit organization trying to make the world a greener place. Their weapon of choice: clean energy.

Since its founding a few years ago, Groundswell has been making efforts to debunk stereotypes of clean energy being unaffordable or a hassle to attain.
Choosing to set up shop in DC was an easy choice for Groundswell, because besides having a thriving start-up culture, DC is one of 16 places in the U.S. which allows for residents to choose their energy suppliers. Groundswell’s success is a story of the power in numbers. Will Byrne is the co-founder and CEO of Groundswell, and our Small Business Spotlight tells his story.

D.C.: A Tale of Two Cities

With businesses and people constantly coming and going and frequent policy changes, the state of D.C.’s economy is tough to gauge at times.

“It’s a little bit of a tale of two cities,” Mark Ein, owner of the Washington Kastles told Washington Business Report.

Ein says there are many bright spots in D.C.’s economy despite certain ones that impede growth.

“D.C.’s one of the hottest cities in America right now and people want to be here,” he said, pointing to a hot housing market and city-wide development as factors to boast.

Recommended For You