From the ABC 7 Weather team

Tropical Storm Arthur: Forecast Track

July 2, 2014 - 05:30 PM
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A Hurricane Watch has been issued for the Outer Banks of North Carolina as the storm makes a turn to the north.

Tropical Storm Arthur as of 5 p.m. Wednesday has maximum sustained winds of 70 mph and is moving slowly to the north around 7 mph. It is currently centered around 220 miles south-southeast of Charleston, South Carolina. .

Arthur is encountering some upper-level dry air north and west of the center but conditions are still favorable for intensification in the next 24 hours or so. The forecast continues to show Arthur as a Category 1 hurricane with winds around 85 mph by the time it approaches the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

The storm is expected to continue to the north today before a slight turn to the northeast into Thursday morning. As it approaches the Outer Banks and Mid Atlantic, the system will start to push farther northeast into the Atlantic as it encounters the frontal boundary which will move into our area today and tomorrow. This will be the feature that you can thank for hopefully making for a dry 4th of July fireworks display.

8am NHC forecast track update

For Friday, expect cloudy skies, breezy winds and possible showers in the morning hours in the D.C. area. The best chance for rain will be east of the city. Conditions should improve by the afternoon, with a little bit of clearing and diminishing breezes. Temperatures will be more comfortable in the mid 80s and humidity levels will fall with dewpoints back in the low 60s and upper 50s. Not like our typical 4th of July!

WPC QPF forecast for this morning through Saturday morning

If you are heading to the beaches, including the Delmarva, heavier rainfall is more likely along with high surf and gusty winds. Thursday and Friday will be the worst. Heavy rain, high surf and gusty winds will be likely, so get your movie tickets soon!

Saturday and Sunday will be sunny and warm, but dangerous rip currents will continue to be a likelihood as the remnants of the storm move farther northeast into the Atlantic. Keep this in mind if you are heading there and be sure to check with the lifeguards before entering the water if you aren't a strong swimmer or familiar with rip currents.

Check back here for the latest updates.

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